How to Back Up Your Data When Your Windows PC Won’t Boot

Now, you can recover your data from a Windows PC that refuses to boot due to some malware or just a hosed configuration . . . If you have data worth saving . . . this article is worth a read and follow up.

I will be covering these points in more detail at a future meeting – – – no need to pay some local tech shop $150 or so.    Once data is retrieved, then a standard Windows install can be initiated.

MakeTechEasier Link to Data Recovery for Frozen PC

How to Get the Most Out of Your Chromebook

Now you can get the best of all major computing platforms on a 3rd generation Chromebook.   You can run:

  • ChromeOS (an enhanced flavor of the Chrome Browser),
  • LinuxOS’s (Xubuntu, Ubuntu, Solus and others – by just switching tabs in the Chrome Browser) (uses the “Crouton” environment)
  • Android Apps (will run on ANY 3rd gen Chromebook, e.g., Intel or ARM),
  • MS-Windows Apps (several methods including VM’s (requires min of 4 GiB of ram).   This works but is more challenging than just running Android Apps or Linux . . .

For those adventurous enough to give it a try . . here’s more info from Cameron Summerson at HTG:

HTG on Chromebook Versatility

PS:   one of the “really” nice features of ChromeOS (unlike any other OS that I’m aware of) . . . is the ability to EASILY restore a pristine factory setup INCLUDING automagically restoring your personal files (photos, media etc.)!!

App restorations are also simple via the official online repos.  (Google or Samsung Store, . . etc.).

 

 

Live Sharing of Videos and Desktops during OTC Meetings . .

A handy tool to share your desktops (from phone, tablet or PC) during a club meeting.  Link below the graphic explains basic setup.   Best to also test on your digital TV at home.

Note that the PC can be a Chromebook or running Windows, Linux, MacOS but does require the Chrome browser on the PC and “Google Home” app on the other devices.

 

Chromecast Setup Article

Meerkat Bluetooth Speaker Musings

I thought that I would list the results of using Bluetooth to connect to speakers.

I have 3 Bluetooth devices: and Insignia Stereo Speaker, Echo, and Trekz Titanium bone-conducting headphones.

After pairing the Insignia works, but the speakers are just fair. The Echo has much better sound and pairs well after giving Alexa instruction to pair. The Trekz is great with the day long live and clear sound. It’s like the sound from an old stereo.

Yesterday, I hooked up the Echo to the Mercat. After playing for about a half hour the sound became scratchy. This also happens with the Insignia, often it is scratchy from the start.  But it has never (fingers crossed) happened with the Trekz.

So I am wondering, do the processors get overworked? It never happens when the Echo plays my Amazon music. I would think that the audio signal is not being decoded when the distortion could occur.

So I am asking the group for explanations of this phenomena.

Using Bleachbit on Ubuntu

Yes, you can use Bleachbit on Ubuntu but for a slightly different reason.   Like all Operating Systems, Linux flavors do get extra file accumulation.

In the Linux OS, this doesn’t slow down your system but it does take extra space that could other be used on a smaller SSD such as my 120 Gig SanDisk.

So, here’s a ten minute youtube video explaining how to use it as well as doing some preliminary “manual” cleanup via the Terminal (aka CLI – command line interface).

The presenter obviously is South_Central Asian, so please pay close attention as he covers this material (which also can be run on MacOS or Windows).